2020 AHI Annual Symposium

Due to the uncertainty surrounding COVID, the Auckland History Initiative has opted for an online event this year to support and celebrate research into Auckland’s past. Rest assured we intend to have our annual Symposium and Lecture again in 2021, all things going well.

We warmly invite you to register and attend our Online Webinar ‘The pleasures and problems of writing Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland’s local histories’, to be held on Friday 27 November, 11-1pm.

Please click this URL to join the Zoom webinar: https://auckland.zoom.us/j/91377139202?wd=alB3TjNoTXZFZDJQMnBITmlFMnkxQT09

Passcode: 464585

This panel will feature the work and the perspectives of professional historians engaged with researching and writing Auckland history. The discussion will focus on some of the key challenges, including the importance of micro-histories, gaps in local discourses, negative attitudes toward research into Auckland’s history, and negotiating relationships with key parties as well as the many pleasures of writing the local histories of Auckland.

Our online panelists :

Jenny Carlyon

Debbie Dunsford

Helen Laurenson

Margaret McClure

Diana Morrow

Auckland City Centenaryfilm and panel discussion 

Join a panel of historians from the University of Auckland to discuss stories of Tāmaki Makaurau with a chance to socialise in Old Government House afterwards. Registration required.

October 18, 2019

4-5.30pm and drinks to 7pm (if registered)

Old Government House, the University of Auckland, Auckland CBD, Auckland 1010

An Auckland History Initiative event: The NZ On Screen documentary Auckland City Centenary –Last, Loneliest, Loveliest celebrates Auckland City which was established in 1871. The opening and closing scenes picture the Waitematā harbour – water being integral in weaving the stories of Tāmaki Makaurau and the journeys its people have made. Far from being a classic depiction of progress, the film presents a sobering account of Auckland’s history and a disparaging forecast for the future. This thought-provoking documentary will be screened and followed by a discussion led by a panel of historians from the University of Auckland. The film poses the question: does Auckland have a soul? Our collective identity will be one of many big questions explored in this panel along with ideas related to the City’s cultural diversity and relationship with the environment.

2019 AHI Annual Symposium

On 15 April 2019, the AHI hosted its inaugural Symposium at the Waipapa Marae, the University of Auckland. The day included a keynote address from Professor Grace Karskens of the University of New South Wales, presentations from leading Auckland historians and a series of panels in the afternoon that featured the 2019 Summer Research Scholars. View the 2019 AHI Symposium Programme.

Ngā mihi to all that attended and were involved in the discussions around Auckland’s past. Below is a collection of highlights from the day.

Grace Karskens

Grace Karskens

Going Public: Historians, Public History and the Power of Place Abstract What is the role of historians in public history? Are they revered experts and instigators? Equal collaborators? Or do they just provide the ‘colourful’ stories in public history projects?...

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Ben Schrader

Ben Schrader

Government House: The first ‘Auckland’ building? Ben Schrader The Maoriland period (1890-1910s) was the genesis of New Zealand cultural nationalism. Recent research on Maoriland cultural production and consumption – in literature and the wider arts – has shown how...

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Charlotte MacDonald

Charlotte MacDonald

Glitter and Gore: Auckland’s origins as a garrison town Charlotte Macdonald Amongst the first and most consistent European presence in colonial Auckland were redcoat soldiers of British regiments sent as part of the Governor’s retinue; as a fighting force in the...

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Hazel Petrie

Hazel Petrie

Black Fellows and White Chinamen: Chinese, Indian, Lebanese, & Dalmatians arrive in Auckland, c1890-1920s Hazel Petrie Abstract New Zealand’s earliest non-Polynesian immigrants were largely British.  From 1840, their numbers grew exponentially until, by about...

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