AHI Summer Research Scholarships

 

Research Articles

 

The fluidity of Ngāti Te Ata rohe

Part Three The fluidity of Ngāti Te Ata rohePart One Understanding historic Māori fluidity within Ngāti Te Ata Waiōhua: An outlinePart Two Te Whakapapa o Ngāti Te Ata Waiōhua The Whakapapa of Ngāti Te AtaPart Four  Part Five  by Tommy de Silva* It is a common...

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Understanding historic Māori fluidity within Ngāti Te Ata Waiōhua: An outline

Understanding historic Māori fluidity within Ngāti Te Ata Waiōhua: An outline

by Tommy de Silva*
What does the term ‘Tāmaki Makaurau’ mean? Some would argue that it means ‘Tāmaki of a hundred lovers’, while others would claim it means ‘Tāmaki desired by many’ or ‘Tāmaki the bride sought by a hundred’. No matter which meaning you prefer, they all clearly suggest that Tāmaki has long been a place sought after by many rōpū (groups).

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Sanctuary at the Ends of the Earth

Sanctuary at the Ends of the Earth

Part Three Sanctuary at the Ends of the EarthPart One Setting-up Auckland’s Jewish CommunityPart Two 19th Century Jewish Community of Central AucklandPart Four Conserving Auckland’s Nineteenth Century Built Jewish Heritageby Sarah Oliver* “The colony of New Zealand...

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19th Century Jewish Community of Central Auckland

19th Century Jewish Community of Central Auckland

Part Two 19th Century Jewish Community of Central AucklandPart One Setting-up Auckland’s Jewish CommunityPart Three Sanctuary at the Ends of the EarthPart Four Conserving Auckland’s Nineteenth Century Built Jewish Heritageby Sarah Oliver* In the nineteenth century,...

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Setting-up Auckland’s Jewish Community

Setting-up Auckland’s Jewish Community

by Sarah Oliver*
“David Nathan had decided that if the powers-to-be determined that the new capital was to be on the shores of the Waitemata Harbour then he would follow.” David Nathan was one of the first Jews to move to the shores of the Waitematā Harbour, where in 1841, Captain William Hobson announced the new capital of New Zealand was to be built.

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The Post-1893 Political Environment for Auckland Women

The Post-1893 Political Environment for Auckland Women

by Saana Judd*
In 1893, women in New Zealand won the right to vote in parliamentary elections. During this time, the social, political, and economic environment for women was undergoing a period of great change. The end of the nineteenth-century saw women begin to attend university in greater numbers and enter the workforce more fully.

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The Removal of the Pacific Community from Greater Ponsonby

The Removal of the Pacific Community from Greater Ponsonby

by Flynn McGregor-Sumpter*
From the late 1970s and into the 1980s the identity of Greater Ponsonby began to shift yet again. Unlike the changes that occurred in the 1950s and 1960s, in which Pacific people moved into and started to dominate this region, this period saw the removal of the Pacific community from Auckland’s central suburbs.

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The Role of the Church in Pacific Immigrants’ Lives

The Role of the Church in Pacific Immigrants’ Lives

by Flynn McGregor-Sumpter*
Religious faith and the Church play a significant part in the lives of many Pacific Island people. From the beginning of Polynesian immigration to New Zealand, the Church played a prominent role for the Pacific communities in this country. For Pacific people, “the Church was the place to which one went on all ordinary occasions, and it was a normal and essential part of life”.

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